Thursday, April 23, 2009

Stop, think, cook.

Normally my meals come together as a dash of some far-off idea crashing into the reality of what is available in my kitchen and within my time frame. These ideas often go from planning to implementation in under five minutes. Elegant, this workflow is not.

 

Reading this post (or any other post on that blog) has made me start to realize that perhaps a bit more thought should go into my dinners. Perhaps I am missing out on a huge arena of food-gasmic awesomeness simply due to lack of a time investment in the planning stages.

 

I’m not sure why this concept is foreign to me. Maybe I just rush through my daily life too often, in a hurry to get arrive at a tomorrow that never quite gets here. But I’m starting to realize that there is more. More that can be had by a simple investment of more time in the planning process, slowing down and considering before acting.

 

Integrating this concept into my life is one of my new goals.

9 comments:

Chickenbells said...

We are taught to rush rush in this culture of ours. How many times have you been looking forward to something, only to be rushed through it and on to the next thing...or after having experienced it, thought to yourself, Now what?! Part of any of the creative process is often the thought that goes into it. Usually before I start a new project, I enjoy a lot of inner mind time...just mentally making it, going through the steps over and over to see if there is a better way to make such a thing. It's just as wonderful and satisfying as the process itself...and often? When you slow your life down, you see the magic that can escape through the rushed moments...

It will be good to see what is next for you...

TomboCheck said...

Sadira - Good call on the inner mind time. That is exactly what I am looking for! Now I just have to clear away all the detritus in my mind to find it.

melissa said...

She left a wonderful comment. Like anything else, you should approach what you ingest in a mindful way. It makes it really special and beautiful. :)

Catalyst said...

Tombo, I heard an interview on NPR today about a woman who adopted her first child at the age of 50 (the woman, not the child). She said she thought she was a much better mother than she would have been earlier because it was easier for her to kick back and take things slower. Maybe we all just get more tired!

But, if you can't slow down . . I highly recommend the food blogs written by Mark Bitten of the New York Times. He likes to cook simply and with minimal ingredients yet turns out fabulous dishes. I recently bought one of his cookbooks from Sadira's shop in Prescott.

Catalyst said...

Oops, I meant Mark Bittman. His blog is called Bitten.

Sillie_Girl said...

Tom sometimes the best thing we can do is take that deep breath and stop even if it is only for a few moments to clear our heads. Maybe the phrase "stop and smell the roses" is the right idea maybe slowing down and enjoying the moment is the way to live.

TomboCheck said...

Melissa - I don't have a mindful way yet. I've pretty much jumped head first into everything I've done to date. The time for change is nigh.

Catalyst - Maybe I am just getting tired. Seems a bit early in life for such a thing though. And thanks for the info, I'll start looking into it. :)

D - That's what I'm starting to think. Smelling the roses not so much for the scent as for the experience gained.

melissa said...

Slowing down is good. It's a lesson that is very hard for me. Damn.

And hooray for Mark Bittman. His book 'How to Cook Everything' is a wonderful resource that makes you think about food in a very simple way and that's a good thing. I still have it on my shelf.

TomboCheck said...

Melissa - Dang, two votes for Bittman, I might just have to pick up a book. :)