Friday, February 27, 2009

Have a good weekend!

The weekend is here at last, enjoy!

8 comments:

Tony said...

Chrysler? Nice shot. Very chromey.
By the way, saw the two of you on the street yesterday(Willis) but too far away to yell hello. So Hello. Actually I recognised D. and figured it was T. under the hat. Have a good Weekend.

TomboCheck said...

Tony - Chevrolet, but I'm uncertain as to make and model. I'll have to do some investigation before I post the rest of the pix. :)

Spotted us eh? Good ol' lunch hour walks! Next time just start yelling. If I see a crazy guy hollering at us I will just assume it's you. :-P

Jarart said...

This is too cool!!

Jarart said...

Did you use photoshop to do this? What technique did you use? It looks amazing!

TomboCheck said...

Jarart - thanks, glad you like it. There will be a few more coming once I finish processing them. :)

As for how it is done, this is a 3 exposure HDR. Three shots are merged in photoshop, then sent out to another program (photomatix) to map the tones and colors, then sent back to photoshop for touchup. I've got a basic post here.

Rich recently did a set of posts that covers it a little more in depth. Although our workflows are a little different, the majority is the same.
One, two, three, four.

If you are interested in seeing all my HDR images you can see them here. If you have any questions - feel free to ask. :)

Rob said...

looks like a custom high-pass filter and possibly some solarizing? Now you got us curious, how did you filter it? :D

rob said...

Interesting. After reading Rich's posts and doing some reading up on HDR, it sounds a lot like what they call "compression" in the music industry - and we're not talking file compression here, LOL!

Intro to sound compression:
http://www.humbuckermusic.com/comex.html

TomboCheck said...

Rob - A very apt association, although I would say it could also be likened to file compression. :) Taking a large amount of info and 'dumbing' it down to fit a smaller box, only in this case the 'box' is the displayable range of a monitor and/or printer.